Conference

Trainings & Workshops

NRJS_web_imageheader_09.jpg

Workshop

Series A Speakers

Monday, November 19 | 10:30a - 12:00n

NRJS_web_imageheader_03.jpg

A1 | Chris Cowie

Organization: Community Justice Initiatives of Waterloo Region

Topic/Title: Restorative Justice Approaches to Healing from Sexual Harm

+ Abstract

In a time when the adversarial approach of the legal system often fails to provide satisfaction for victims of sexual harm or to promote accountability in offenders, CJI has developed an innovative approach to healing from sexual harm that empowers victims and has generated real life, inspiring stories of transformation. Revive offers an alternative response for those who have been impacted by sexual trauma. CJI’s innovative approach extends services to offenders, victims, as well as partners and family members of offenders and victims. In particular, CJI’S Facilitated Dialogue (FD) process is designed to assist families and communities to heal from sexual harm. Recognizing that most sexual violence occurs within relationships, FD works to heal these broken relationships through conversations guided by trained staff and volunteers. FD provides an opportunity for individuals and families to come together in a safe way to be heard, develop understanding and find a way to move forward through the devastation of sexual trauma. The FD process has the potential to:

  • repair the sexual harm that has been caused by a sexual offence
  • increase the sense of responsibility for the person who has offended sexually
  • provide an opportunity for the person who was sexually harmed to receive reparation
  • provide an opportunity for victims to ask questions and receive information from the offender
  • provide a means for sexual violence survivors to talk about how the incident impacted them
  • provide sexual violence survivors an opportunity to take back power

The FD process can be utilized by persons who have survived sexual trauma, persons who have caused sexual harm and/or their respective families. FD usually involves several meetings and/or other forms of contact – often over a period of months. On average the FD process takes 15 hours total, including intake, case development meetings, and the dialogue itself. There is no cost to the participants for engaging in the FD process.

+ Session Objectives

  1. To share information on CJI’s various approaches to sexual harm
  2. To challenge session participants to consider how restorative justice approaches can be applied to sexual harm for both offenders, survivors and their support networks

+ Speaker Bio

Chris has been a senior manager in community charities related to justice, anti-poverty, community development, and international mission since 1988. He received an MA in Leadership from the University of Guelph. In 1989 while working with young offenders at another agency, he collaborated with Community Justice Initiatives to develop a Victim Offender Reconciliation program. Witnessing the power of Restorative Justice, he became a strong proponent of using restorative practices in response to many kinds of crime and conflict. Chris is a long-standing member of Waterloo Region’s Crime Prevention Council and has taught a variety of courses at both the University of Waterloo and Conestoga College.

 

+ Abstract

The greatest lesson Waneek Horn-Miller ever learned was that “anything is possible.” Suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome after being stabbed, at the age of fourteen, she could have recoiled from life. Instead, she embraced it like never before. On stage, she traces the powerful journey she took from beleaguered youth to star Olympic athlete to one of the most articulate and vibrant voices in Canada today. A model of perseverance, good-natured humour, and souful wisdom, Horn-Miller inspires audiences to follow their own dreams, fight for their heritage, and achieve their full potential in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds. “Motivation is the biggest thing and the key to your success,” she says. “You have to figure out what it is that’s the trigger for your motivation and recruit people into helping you, and, as well, get tough with yourself. Look in the mirror and say, I’ve had it with all the excuses. I want to make my dreams my reality, and I want to start today.”

+ Session Objectives

To be Confirmed

+ Speaker Bio

WANEEK HORN-MILLER has overcome discrimination and trauma to emerge as one of North America’s most inspiring activists and Olympians. From her iconic TIME cover to her former role in the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, she empowers our communities to overcome adversity, and helps us turn reconciliation—justice, healing, and dialogue—into a cornerstone of our national institutions.

“There are a lot of women I know who have been the victims of violence, or know someone who has been impacted by violence. But I want the public to know that this issue is not just an Indigenous issue; it’s a Canadian issue.” — Waneek Horn-Miller

Throughout her life, Waneek Horn-Miller has always stood up for what was right—as a mother, an activist, an athlete, and an entrepreneur. This has entailed hard choices, pain, and sacrifice. But this commitment has also made her one of Canada’s most inspiring figures. Previously, she assumed the role of Director of Community Engagement for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, a position she held until 2017. By connecting the commission to victims’ families, as well as the public, she provided a recognizable and trusted face to an incredibly important initiative: one that seeks justice, raises awareness of violence against Indigenous women, and furthers the dual tasks of healing and reconciliation.

Horn-Miller’s public life began in 1990 at the age of 14. During the Oka Crisis, she protested the planned development of condos and a golf course on traditional Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) lands and burial grounds near Montreal. After nearly 80 days of stand-off with the RCMP and armed forces, she was stabbed in the chest by a Canadian soldier wielding a bayonet. The image of her wounded, holding her young sister, was shared across national media—and further galvanized Canadians to better understand, and care about, Indigenous issues.

This near-death experience marked a turning point in her life. Instead of succumbing to very real traumas, including PTSD, she found the strength to pursue, and achieve, incredible things. “I come from people who have gone through horrific things in history,” she says. “War, death, famine, genocide. How many times did my ancestors want to give up, lay down, and die? But they didn’t. They fought to continue. You have to keep going forward.”

“I encourage all Canadian youth to look beyond colour and borders and work as a team to solve issues together.” — Waneek Horn-Miller

One of Horn-Miller’s greatest achievements has been in athletics. “Sport in the Native world is more than just something to be physically active,” she says. “It’s a suicide preventer. It’s a self-esteem creator. It’s a leadership developer.” She was the first woman to be named Carleton University’s Athlete of the Year, which she won four years in a row. After winning gold with her water polo team at the Pan Am Games in 1999, and after winning MVP of the Canadian Senior Women’s Water Polo National Championships, she became the first Mohawk woman from this country to ever compete in the Olympic games, co-captaining Team Canada in Sydney in 2000. That same year, she appeared on the cover of TIME magazine. This became another iconic image—one of dignity, poise, and power, as opposed to pain and fear—as well as a milestone for Indigenous athletes. She went on to win bronze at the 2001 FINA World Championships and became a torchbearer for the Winter Olympics in Turin. She has been named one of Canada’s most influential women in sport by the Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity.

After her retirement as an athlete, she has gone on to help others achieve in sports and lead healthy, balanced lifestyles. She was Assistant Chef de Mission for Team Canada at the 2015 Pan Am Games. She is also the host of Working It Out Together—a 13-part documentary and healthy-eating initiative with the Aboriginal Peoples’ Television Network, which aims to build “an Indigenous movement of positive change” and “features dynamic leaders in health advocacy and courageous men and women who are figuring out what it takes to be well and to thrive.” Her work here was recognized with a 2015 DAREarts Cultural Award.

She is also an ambassador for Manitobah Mukluks, the world-famous footwear brand that has been worn by Kate Moss, Jessica Biel, and Megan Fox. Known for being Indigenous-owned and proudly Canadian, Manitobah Mukluks supports Indigenous communities, shares success with others, keeps traditions alive, and celebrates living history—a compelling blend of fashion, quality product, and social responsibility.

A2 | Waneek Horn-Miller

TOPIC/TITLE: turning trauma to motivation: building strength, confidence, and community

 

A3 | Craig Goebel

Organization: Legal aid saskatchewan

Topic/Title: How to make the best of Therapeutic courts: A legal aid perspective. 

+ Abstract

SK has a plethora of therapeutic courts, not all of which have the same foundational elements or processes that are similar. While variations to account for local and participants' needs may be appropriate, and some services and alternatives might not be available everywhere, participants should get similar service and outcomes. For Legal Aid, variable service requirements mean having to provide different / higher amounts of resources to courts and clients, which mean other services might be / are impacted negatively or if required services are not provided as required, then therapeutic court participants may suffer. the point for discussion is to determine if these courts' foundational and procedural elements and services and alternative measures can be rationalized and how to set up templates for having those discussions.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Determine basic templates for discussion on rationalizing courts' elements and services and outcomes
  2. Use the templates to determine their utility and make changes if necessary.

+ Speaker Bio

Craig is the Chief Executive Officer of Legal Aid Saskatchewan, which organization offers legal representation to low income individuals for adult and youth criminal charges and duty counsel services and legal representation for family matters. Such services are provided by nearly 100 lawyers and paralegals, supported by about 60 staff, in 15 offices throughout the province including Head Office. Prior to holding this office, Mr. Goebel worked for the Legal Services Society of BC (Legal Aid) as a senior manager of several departments.

 

A4 | Meredith Egan

Organization: independent

Topic/Title: Bringing Restorative Justice into Unusual Context - Federal Prisons.

                    ****SOLD OUT****

         

+ Abstract

Since about 2005, Meredith Egan has had the privilege of offering courses about restorative justice to medium-security inmates and volunteers in federal prisons. One aspect of this has been creating safe space for victims of serious crime to visit and share their stories of the impact of crime, and how restorative justice has affected them.

Learn about the 12-15 session

  • course curriculum,
  • the use of varied learning methodologies employed,
  • who chose to attend the courses,
  • strategies used to retain reluctant learners, and create safety, and
  • the individual topics covered.

As well, we will talk about the impact of the course (as reported to through a study conducted by Kwantlen Polytechnic University staff and students). Meredith will encourage participants to share their experiences of sharing values, principles and practices of restorative justice in unusual communities and institutions.

  • What are the imperative values of restorative justice to frame the teachings?
  • What do they look like in action?
  • What elements of the practice need to be shared/adapted for the participants/course/context?
  • How do we share them?

Finally,

  • Are there new spaces and communities that would welcome these learning opportunities?
  • How would the practice of restorative justice be changed by including the wisdom from these communities?

+ Session Objectives

  1. The value of exploring restorative justice in unusual settings and communities
  2. An opportunity to share facilitation experiences, learn from one another and explore the impact of sharing our stories.

+ Speaker Bio

Meredith Egan is an author and professional certified coach who has worked in restorative justice with crime victims and prisoners for more than twenty five years. She has been trained in mediation and peacemaking circles and has been honoured to learn from many First Nations people. Meredith has taught and spoken in schools, universities, prisons and communities on restorative justice, creative writing, victim empathy, and personal transformation, throughout Canada and internationally.

In 2016, Meredith released Just Living: A Novel. It characterizes the complicated relationships that exist in the aftermath of crime. It was extensively worked inside prison, with creative writing critique groups in medium security prisons.

Dr. Meredith Egan’s first training was in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. She holds a Doctorate in Pharmacy from University of Alberta. Her executive coach training was received at Royal Roads University.

Meredith is the principal at Wild Goat Executive Coaching (wildgoatcoaching.ca), working extensively in business settings now.

 

A5 | Scott Cruickshank

Organization: MOJ, Dispute Resolution Office

Topic/Title: Creating Engagement in Restorative Practices

+ Abstract

There are all sorts of varying obstacles that can make it difficult for people to engage meaningfully in restorative processes. Even though there are productive ways to manage with who you have, the ideal is still to have the right people present and them engaging in meaningful discussions. This presentation will be an interactive look at some of these obstacles and consider what psychology and neuroscience is saying about why people disengage and what practitioners are doing to increase engagement.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Identify barriers to participant engagement and discuss how they work
  2. Discuss methods to increase participants engagement in restorative justice practices

+ Speaker Bio

Scott has worked in private practice and with community agencies for over 12 years before starting with The Dispute Resolution Office February 2011.

Before coming to the Dispute Resolution Office Scott had been involved in the piloting new conflict resolution initiatives and community programs in. He was involved in the early development of the program and later served in the role of program coordinator for a time. His experiences in the area of victim offender mediation led to him develop and administer the provinces first serious offence mediation program for Regina Alternative Measures Program after seeing significant success in the nationally recognized Help Eliminate Auto Theft program. His private practice experience included facilitation of workplace disputes and return to work discussions, insurance claim, and community and church disputes.

Scott’s current work with the Dispute Resolution Office includes:

  • Family Separation Mediation including High Conflict Family referrals from court
  • Child Protection Mediation
  • Group training/facilitation in conflict resolution and mediation skills
  • Civil Court Mediation
  • Workplace/organizational Mediation and consulting
  • Training and workshop facilitator
 
 

A6 | Ashlee Longmoore and Lindsay Wilcox

Organization: John Howard Society

Topic/Title: The Community Learning HUB and its application to Restorative Justice programming.

+ Abstract

The Community Learning HUB is an online facilitator-led life-skills tool used to deliver programming to in-need or at-risk populations. The content focuses on areas such as financial literacy, employment skills, substance use, emotional awareness and youth empowerment. The "HUB" can be used as you need, either to build up a program you see lacking in your organization or to supplement what you already have. This presentation will introduce you to the HUB and give you some ideas of how you might use it in your restorative justice programming.

+ Session Objectives

  1. To introduce the Community Learning HUB as an innovative and interactive life-skills tool.
  2. To demonstrate the Community Learning HUB's practical application to Restorative Justice programming.

+ Speaker Bios

Ashlee began her career in the restorative justice field working as a mediator in an extra-judicial sanctions program. She has since continued her work with in-need and at-risk populations as a youth worker, program coordinator and volunteer.

Lindsay has worked for the JHSS Moose Jaw Branch as a Mediation Caseworker within our Extra Judicial Sanctions and Alternative Measures programs for 11 years and currently is the Assistant Program Coordinator for the Moose Jaw Branch.

 

A7 | Father Andre

Organization: STR8 UP

Topic/Title: STR8 UP Presentation

+ Abstract

STR8UP’s program model, and the format of the Presentations is built around the Indigenous healing model (Medicine Wheel) which portrays these men and women (members) not as deviant or criminals but rather as ‘hurting’ and ‘sick’ who are in need of emotional, mental, spiritual and physical healing.

+ Session Objectives

  1. To enable the process of reconciliation, healing, confidence building and the development of leadership skills for the recovering gang members. to assist in the process of reconciliation and confidence building for the ex-gang members
  2. To educate the community about the realities of the lives of gang members and the challenges of abandoning that lifestyle within the context of the justice system.
  3. Training new and senior STR8 UP members in developing the necessary skills to facilitate workshops and presentations.

The Presentations follows a consistent format, involving an overview of the STR8UP Gang Intervention healing model by Father Andre or a Program Facilitator, followed by presentations by STR8 UP members themselves, who share their stories of how they became involved in the gang life and what it is taking for them to turn their lives around. These presentations are a key part of the process for STR8UP members self-empowerment and rehabilitation in achieving a healthy transformation. Open discussion and exchange with the audiences will close the session.

+ Speaker Bio

Father Andre as he is called in the streets has been working for over 25 years with marginalized youth and adults. Founder of STR8 UP Inc., which helps ex-gang members move from despair to hope has been part over 350 individuals throughout his involvement. Today, Father Andre continues to be involved with STR8 UP attending court, meeting people in the correctional and helping deliver presentations.

 

A8 | Shana Mohr and Tanya Beachamp

Organization: FASD Network

Topic/Title: Ethical considerations of RJ and FASD

+ Abstract

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada spent six years travelling to all parts of Canada to hear from approximately 7,000 survivors of the residential school system which resulted in the release of the Call to Action Report in June 2015. The Calls to Action report outlines 94 areas that need to be addressed. Call to Action #30 and #31 addresses the over incarceration of Indigenous peoples. Call to Action #33 and #34, outline the issue of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

Shana Mohr (Training Coordinators, FASD Network) and Tanya Beauchamp (Support Program manager, FASD Network) will facilitate an in-depth presentation on FASD, examining how the neurodevelopmental deficits associated with FASD present a fundamental challenge to the Canadian justice system. This session will provide insights into the many ethical consideration when representing clients who have a diminished capacity to foresee consequences, make reasoned choices or whose actions are likely to clash with assumptions about human behaviour at almost every stage of the justice system.

Following the presentation, participants will be asked to “map the issues” by responding to the questions, including: (1) Where are we now? (2) Where do we want to go? And (3) What is needed to get there? Discussion will enable participants to reflect on the current position and dialogue surrounding FASD and discuss ways in which they can move forward within their own jurisdictions.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Raise Awareness of FASD
  2. Reduce stigma surrounding FASD.

+ Speaker Bio

Shana Mohr is the Training Coordinator for the FASD Network of Saskatchewan and member of the CanFASD Family Advisory Committee. She has trained hundreds of professionals, caregivers, and individuals with intellectual disabilities and about the complexities of FASD. Shana is also the mom to an amazing daughter who lives with FASD and motivates her unlimited passion for and dedication to the cause. Her daughter continues to be her most important teacher in the world of FASD.

Tanya Beauchamp is the Support Program Manager at the FASD Network of Saskatchewan. Tanya has a 4-year Bachelor Degree majoring in Sociology. Tanya Beauchamp has worked in the field of Justice for over ten years, she is an experienced advocate and is passionate about Human Rights and Truth and Reconciliation in Canada.

 

*Please note, speakers are subject to change.

Workshop

Series B Speakers

Monday, November 19 | 2:30p - 4:00p

NRJS_web_imageheader-02.jpg

B1 | Alan Edwards and Jennifer Haslett, Jo Ann Oliver & Family

Organization: Independent

Topic/Title: Restorative Justice After a Violent Home-Invasion: One Family's Journey.

+ Abstract

On June 26, 2002, in Saskatoon, Jo Oliver was attacked in her own home by two intruders, who beat her severely and ransacked her home. In October 2015, Jo and members of her family began to work toward communicating with one of the offenders, through the Restorative Opportunities Program. In June 2016, at Saskatchewan Penitentiary, Jo and three family members met with the offender. In this workshop, they will tell their story of that meeting, what motivated them to participate, and what they got out of it.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Learn about a victim offender encounter in a case of serious and violent crime, its challenges and the value of this encounter.
  2. The importance of offering a process that is shaped by and responsive to victim needs.

+ Speaker Bio

Jo Oliver is retired and living in Saskatoon after raising a family and working in the farming community near Hafford Saskatchewan. In June of 2002, ten days after moving to the city, her home was invaded by two men who attacked her with an axe and robbed her. After recovering in the hospital, she returned to her home gradually recovering a sense of security in her new home and community. In 2016, Jo and three of her family members met with one of the men who assaulted her.

Peter is the son of Jo Oliver. Peter has worked as a Chaplain in the provincial and federal correctional systems for 13 years. He is married with three children and is currently exploring a second career in the area of conflict resolution.

Alan Edwards and Jennifer Haslett have been working together and separately in restorative justice for over 20 years. Jointly, they have co-facilitated countless encounters between victims and offenders, mostly in cases involving violence. Since 2004, they have been working exclusively on cases of serious and violent crime, in the Restorative Opportunities Program of Correctional Service Canada. They have co-authored three papers on restorative justice and violence, and have delivered workshops in British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario. Jennifer coordinated a non-profit Victim Offender Mediation program in the community for 6 years. She has co-instructed a Critical Issues in Restorative Justice course at the University of Alberta and participated on a national Steering Committee to develop the Canadian Restorative Justice Consortium.
Alan has developed and delivered training in restorative justice throughout Canada and in several U.S. states. And, like Jennifer, he has spoken to numerous classes in law, criminology, and social work about restorative justice philosophy and practice. He has co-authored two papers with Susan Sharpe on the topic of RJ and domestic violence. Together, Alan and Jennifer received the 2010 Outstanding Leadership in Restorative Justice Award from the Edmonton Restorative Justice Network. In 2016, Alan was the recipient of the Ron Wiebe National Restorative Justice Award.

 

B2 | Mr. Carsten Erbe and Dr. Kevin Wipf, and Ryan Mueller

Organization: Alberta Justice and Solicitor General

Topic/Title: Establishing a Restorative Justice Program in a Provincial Correctional Facility: Lessons Learned.

+ Abstract

The presentation discusses the Alberta government's recent experience in piloting a restorative justice correctional program in Lethbridge AB, and its explored expansion into other correctional facilities in the province. As the initiative closely mirrors and adapts Correctional Services Canada's Restorative Opportunities Program, challenges and learnings are discussed in relation to the shorter times, less serious offenses, and often more transient inmate populations that provincial correctional facilities house. The presentation also discussions the partnerships created to implement the Alberta model and the further expansion of the piloting phase to explore a more universally accessible approach within Alberta Corrections.
The session will be of interest to correctional administrators, community practitioners, and victim services agencies as to how to establish and adapt these correctional RJ models in their own jurisdictions.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Educate other provincial/territorial partners on how Alberta adapted RJ programs to work in the provincial correctional context
  2. Demonstrate the value of post-conviction RJ processes to victims, offenders, community and justice administrators

+ Speaker Bio

Carsten Erbe is the Director of Crime Prevention and Restorative Justice for the Public Security Division of Alberta Justice and Solicitor General (JSG). Carsten has worked in the field of restorative justice for over 20 years, including the jurisdictions of Yukon, Florida, Colorado, and Australia. He holds master’s degrees in public administration from the University of Victoria and in Cross-Cultural Studies (Criminology) from Queensland University of Technology (Brisbane, Australia). He is currently the provincial representative of the Federal/Provincial/Territorial working group on restorative justice and his interests include community mobilization, policing, corrections, and criminal justice reform.

Kevin Wipf is the Director of Strategic Research and Planning for the Correctional Services Division of the Alberta Justice and Solicitor General (JSG). Kevin has worked for JSG for over five years and has worked in the area of public policy in different capacities for over 15 years. Kevin holds a PhD from the University of Alberta and a Master of Arts from the University of Waterloo. He currently oversees a range of divisional, cross ministry, cross government, and Provincial/Territorial research projects aimed at assessing and reforming government policy in the criminal justice system and improving capacity for evidence-based decision making more generally.

Ryan Mueller is the Deputy Director of Programs with the Lethbridge Correctional Centre. He started his career with the Centre in 2002 as a Correctional Peace Officer and did case work for five years before assuming the Deputy Director role in 2013. Ryan has been instrumental in establishing the restorative justice program in his facility and has quickly seen the benefits of the approach to the community that he serves.

 

B3 | Caroline Gosling and Sue Hopgood

Organization: Engage - Restorative Practices

Topic/Title: Creating a Restorative Culture in Your classroom/school: Intro

                    ****SOLD OUT****

+ Abstract

This introductory session will provide an overview of what a restorative culture could look like any classroom and school. information will be provided on the principles behind restorative practices and how to embed them in day-to-day life resulting in a welcoming, caring, respectful and safe learning environment where students are able to engage in their best learning. A Restorative culture focuses on relationship building, doing the right thing because it is the right thing to do, modeling and teaching responsibility and accountability. Restorative practices and schools move away from the more traditional models to focus on relationships and when necessary, repairing harm. Results from schools who have implement this approach will be shared.

+ Session Objectives

  1. How to embed restorative principles in classrooms and schools to create welcoming, caring, inclusive and safe learning environments.
  2. How to enhance relationships between and among adults and students in schools.

+ Speaker Bio

Caroline is an educator with 30+ years of experience as a teacher, consultant and principal. She has also worked in Alberta Education supporting, welcoming, caring, respectful and save learning environments, mentoring in schools and the Office of Student Attendance and Re-engagement. Caroline holds a Master’s Degree in Education Leadership. For the past 20 years, Caroline has done extensive work in the field of restorative justice, restorative practices in schools, and creating positive school culture for students and adults. She was trained as a community Conferencing facilitator and a trainer of facilitators by Transformative Justice Australia. Caroline is currently a director with Engage – RP. She is chair of the Alberta Restorative Justice Association and has served on other boards including the Zebra Child Protection Centre and Alberta Conflict Transformation Society.

Sue worked for Alberta Conflict Transformation Society for 15 years. In her role there, she was the program coordinator, facilitator and trainer. Sue hold a degree in Criminal Justice from Athabasca University and is currently a director for Engage-Restorative Practices.

Sue has done extensive work in the area of restorative justice and restorative practices in schools, the community and the criminal justice system. She was trained as a Community Conferencing facilitator in 1998 by David Moore and John McDonald from TJA Australia and in 2000, after 2 years of facilitating experience was trained as a trainer by the same organization.

Sue has facilitated over 700 community conferences, ranging from grade one name-calling to fatality situations. She and Caroline have conducted over 75 facilitator trainings.

Sue has been a board member for the Alberta Criminal Justice Association and is a current board member of Family futures Resource Network.

 

B4 | Valarie Binder

Organization: Yukon Government, Restorative Community Conference Program, Youth Supports and Services

Topic/Title: Changing our Language, Changing our Intent: Implementing Restorative Justice Language Into Broader Practice.

+ Abstract

Restorative practices are evolving and becoming entrenched in our justice system, but our language remains the same. Our language encourages our intent. The language that we use today, creates the motivation for tomorrow. The way we currently describe our restorative practices and name those engaged in restorative processes is limiting and often presents to society and our colleagues within the justice field, preconceived notions that may inhibit those who are inquiring or are asked to participate in restorative processes. Working towards advancing restorative practices into mainstream justice, requires us to move away from the use of labels that may be stigmatizing, to more inclusive concepts and words. But what are those new ways of describing our intent? What descriptors can we use to bring restorative practices into the main stream without using fixed and biased labels such as victim and offender? This workshop will be a think-tank for practitioners and stakeholders to discuss ideas for new, comprehensive language that could describe and focus our intent to be more inclusive. This session will bring participants together to envision new language that could encourage mainstream society to become more involved in restorative practices. We will play with user friendly and encouraging language which will promote the implementation of restorative justice being applied into broader practices. We will use a facilitated process to look at the current common language used in restorative justice and consider alternatives for those common words, thereby, hopefully creating a more positive view of restorative practices by all sectors of our society. It is anticipated that after the Symposium, participants of this workshop will continue this dialogue in their own communities and we can create a foundation for future dialogue throughout Canada on more inclusive and encouraging restorative practice’s language.

+ Session Objectives

  1. To bring participants together to envision new language that could encourage mainstream society to become more involved in restorative practices. We will play with user friendly and encouraging language which will promote the implementation of restorative justice being applied into broader practices.
  2. We will play with user friendly and encouraging language which will promote the implementation of restorative justice being applied into broader practices.

+ Speaker Bio

Valarie Binder has been a restorative justice practitioner since 1998. Living and working in Yukon, her passion and energy for restorative processes brought her to her current role as the Coordinator of the Restorative Community Conference Program for Youth Justice, Health & Social Services, Yukon Government. As a facilitator in restorative community conferences and an instructor in Restorative Justice Principles, Practices and Implementation and Facilitating Restorative Community Conferences, Valarie has contributed to and influenced the development of restorative practices throughout Yukon and some parts of Alaska. Valarie has presented on Restorative Justice at national and international conferences, for First Nation Governments and as a guest lecturer at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

 

B5 | Winston Blake

Organization: Restorative Action Program

Topic/Title: Building a safer community... one youth at a time.

+ Abstract

The Restorative Action Program (RAP) is a 15-year-old community-based restorative justice initiative that is hosted in high schools and sustained through the shared responsibility of multiple partners, other supportive organizations and citizens. RAP works with youth to develop and practice conflict management, relationship management and leadership skills using a restorative justice framework that focuses on prevention, intervention and reconnection (PIR).

This presentation will provide participants with knowledge and understanding of how this proven restorative justice framework works with youth to effectively address bullying, physical violence, crime, mental health, substance abuse and suicide/self-harm. Special focus will be given to understanding the processes needed to build and sustain restorative justice practices in schools and how to collaborate with multiple stakeholders. In addition to the broad foundations provided to build capacity to effectively work with youth, schools and the community, participants will also learn how to implement restorative justice strategies and practices using the RAP service delivery framework.

Research and findings from an eight-year study by the University of Saskatchewan’s Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science & Justice Studies will be presented to illustrate the success of the RAP framework in 9 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan high schools and 1 Airdrie, Alberta high school. This is a must attend session for educators, policy makers, restorative justice practitioners and community members.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Participants will receive knowledge and understanding of how this proven restorative justice framework works with youth to address bullying, physical violence, crime, mental health, substance abuse and suicide/self-harm. Special focus will be given to understanding the processes needed to build and sustain restorative justice practices in schools and how to collaborate with multiple stakeholders.
  2. Participants will learn how to implement restorative justice strategies and practices in schools.

+ Speaker Bio

Restorative Action Program’s (RAP) Executive Director, Winston Blake is an engaging speaker who has a reputation for motivating learning, growth and change in his audiences. Winston has spent over 20 years promoting restorative justice, respect, and understanding in various roles such as a conflict management practitioner, presenter, and trainer. He holds an Advanced Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Saskatchewan (1995) and a Masters in Conflict Analysis and Management from Royal Roads University (2015). In addition to his Masters, Winston also has a certificate in Conflict Management from the Alberta Arbitration and Mediation Society (1998) and is a Chartered Mediator with the Alternative Dispute Resolution Institute of Canada (1999). Meeting the needs of youth, families, and the community, is a lifelong commitment and passion for Winston.

 

B6 | Joshua Payer

Organization: Tangasuvvingat Inuit

Topic/Title: Restorative Justice- Northern Knowledge Working in the South.

                  

+ Abstract

This workshop will focus on the ways in which Inuit culture has shaped how restorative justice has been implemented outside Inuit Nunangat namely in Ottawa Ontario. Furthermore, the goal is to also provide an in depth look into the successes and challenges in creating the only Inuit specific Restorative Justice Initiative outside of the north as well as best practices that have been identified.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Provide knowledge of the impact of Inuit culture and Restorative Justice.
  2. Provide an understanding of the successes and challenges Inuit specific Restorative Justice in the South.

+ Speaker Bios

Joshua Payer is the Restorative Practices Liaison at Tungasuvvingat Inuit (T.I.) in Ottawa, Ontario. T.I. is an Inuit-specific provincial service provider that delivers social support, cultural activities, counselling, and crisis intervention as a one-stop resource centre to meet the rapidly growing, complex and evolving needs of Inuit in Ontario. Previously, Joshua worked as a Counsellor at T.I. and in his current role helped the develop and operate of the first Inuit specific Restorative Justice Program outside of Inuit Nunangat. Joshua has over five years of experience supporting the economically disenfranchised population in Ottawa as a shelter worker and manager. He graduated from the University of Ottawa with a degree in Social Sciences with a specialization in Criminology and Psychology.

 

B7 | Gina Alexander

Organization: Community Safety and Well Being, Integrated Justice Services Government of Saskatchewan

Topic/Title: Community Safety and Well Being

                    ****SOLD OUT****

         

+ Abstract

Community Safety and Well-Being partners with communities across Saskatchewan to provide a variety of supports in the area of community safety and well-being planning and development. The Framework focuses on a balance between risk intervention, prevention and social development. We can transform and improve our service to clients when we work together in a collaborative and informed way. We work with community leaders and various levels of government on collaboration, information sharing, and measuring success to ensure success in local planning. We provide tools and resources to support partners working differently together to achieve mutual outcomes.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Overview of Community Safety and Well Being framework.
  2. Importance of collaboration, innovation and measuring success.

+ Speaker Bio

Gina is the Executive Director of Community Safety and Well-Being, Integrated Justice Services, serving both the Ministries of Justice and Attorney General and Corrections and Policing. In this role she is involved in supporting community safety initiatives across the province. Her responsibilities cover province wide programs and initiatives including Victims Services, Hub tables, Restorative Justice Programs, Interpersonal Violence, and Community Safety and Well-Being.

 

B8 | Scott Siemens, Charmaine Panko, and Rob Kennedy

Organization: ADR Institute of Saskatchewan

Topic/Title: Restoring senses of Justice in Amateur Sport

+ Abstract

The ADR Institute of Saskatchewan, in partnership with SaskSport Inc., have created a platform for amateur sport organizations in Saskatchewan to resolve disputes in a neutral and restorative fashion. The results to date have exceeded all expectations with member sport organizations and the leadership of those constituencies. The parties to this initiative have long recognized the intrinsic value of amateur sport in communities large and small across the province, and the capacity for unresolved conflict in those organizations to evolve into sentiments of injustice and harm, thus creating significant turmoil within the sport body and the community at large. The ADR Institute and SaskSport will be presenting a panel discussion on how this initiative has served to restore relationships at the Athlete, Coach, Parent, and Board member level, and how addressing these latent and emerged conflicts at the earliest stages has resulted in restored relationships with a renewed sense of real justice. Attendants will be challenged to consider how restorative justice in an amateur sport environment can be applied in their home constituencies and how using amateur sport as a forum for RJ initiatives can impact communities more broadly.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Value of non-traditional approaches to resolving conflict in sporting constituencies.
  2. Incite participants to consider how their communities might adopt similar approaches.

+ Speaker Bio

Scott Siemens is a Federal Mediator within the Government of Canada’s internal ICMS dispute resolution system, Scott provides mediation and conciliation services to clients internal to the Government of Canada. Primarily focused on workplace and labour disputes, Scott’s role is to foster of Federal workplace free of harassment, violence, and ill- managed conflict. Scott has been working in the field of alternate dispute resolution for over 20 years both inside Canada and beyond. Internationally, Scott has worked on projects in Rwanda, Congo, Northern Ireland, and Laos / Vietnam. Scott enjoys mixing the theoretical and academic elements of dispute resolution with the every-day practical application that can supportively impact people in their daily endeavours. Beyond his Federal Mediator role, Scott works privately with clients in the faith-based constituency and in amateur sport. Scott is a trainer-facilitator for the ADR Institute of Canada (as well as their Past President), and Case Manager for the ADR Institute of Saskatchewan’s partnership with SaskSport. Scott holds a Bachelor of Commerce (U of S - 1984) and a Fellowship with the Institute of Canadian Bankers (U of T - 1992). Scott is a Chartered Mediator with the ADR Institute of Canada.

Charmaine Panko enjoys challenging other practitioners to step outside of their comfort zone and consider alternative and innovative approaches to assisting their clients in problem solving disputes for common sense solutions. She has over a decade experience as settlement counsel and neutral professional in all substantive areas of law including, though not limited to, insurance matters, estate disputes, separation and divorce, and physical injury claims, both as a private practitioner and as a contract service provider with the Government of Saskatchewan. Charmaine has also served as arbitrator and case manager in disputes arising out of not-for-profit and family matters and is currently on the national roster for the Sports Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada as a mediator and arbitrator. She is a facilitator and trainer in negotiation, conflict resolution, collaborative law process, and mediation skills and a sessional lecturer at the College of Law, University of Saskatchewan.

Rob Kennedy has more than 20 years of professional work experience in Saskatchewan’s amateur sport system. Currently he is the Manager of Provincial Sport Development for Sask Sport and oversees the delivery of various services to the members of Sask Sport, including the implementation of the Dispute Resolution services. Rob’s leadership ensures that Sask Sport continues to be a leader in the Canadian sport system in the area of conflict management. This includes providing access to third party support through the Alternate Dispute Resolution Institute of Saskatchewan to their members to ensure disputes and complaints are managed effectively. Rob holds a Bachelor of Science in Physical Education (1995) and a Master of Business Administration (2013), both from the University of Saskatchewan.

 

*Please note, speakers are subject to change.

Workshop

Series C Speakers

Tuesday, November 20 | 10:30a - 12:00n

NRJS_web_imageheader-01.jpg

C1 | Michelle Brass and Larry Chartrand

Organization: Native Law Center

Topic/Title: Gladue Awareness Project and the Relationship to Restorative Justice.

+ Abstract

The session will discuss the Gladue Awareness Project, the related Saskatchewan case law and how Gladue reports may assist in addressing over-representation of Indigenous peoples in prison. There will be a description of the seminars that have been held for the Project, highlighting the discussions that have been generated by those who have attended the seminars. In light of the current 10 year trend of the increasing number of incarcerated Indigenous people, it is clear that something must be constructively done. The seminars have been an opportunity to highlight this serious problem and has been an opportunity for people who work within the criminal justice system to discussion possible solutions. The panel will also discuss how individuals suffering from Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder are impacted by the criminal justice system. In addition, the relationship between restorative justice and Indigenous justice initiatives in the context of implementing Gladue will be explored.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Appreciate the state of Saskatchewan's Justice system in implementing the legal principles based on Gladue
  2. Engage with the debate regarding the role of restorative justice in addressing alternatives to incarceration for Indigenous offenders

+ Speaker Bio

Professor Chartrand is the Academic Director of the Native Law Centre at the University of Saskatchewan on leave from the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law.

Prof. Chartrand’s research interests include issues related to the Aboriginal justice issues including Indigenous peoples’ relationship to the Canadian criminal justice system. He has written several publications and reports dealing with the impact of the criminal justice system and the relationship between Indigenous legal systems and the Canadian legal system and its relationship to restorative justice.

Prof. Chartrand is the Treasurer, Adjudicator and Founding Member of the Indigenous Bar Association Scholarship Foundation. He has also served two terms as President of the Indigenous Bar Association (Aboriginal lawyers, Judges and law students).

In 2017, Professor Chartrand was awarded the distinguished Law Society Medal of Upper Canada in recognition of outstanding service in accordance with the highest ideals of the legal profession.

Michelle Brass is from the Peepeekisis First Nation of the Treaty 4 Territory of Saskatchewan. Michelle obtained her B.A. in Philosophy from the University of Regina in 1991. She then obtained her L.LB. from the University of Saskatchewan, College of Law in 1997. She was called to the Saskatchewan Bar in 1998 and has since practiced law since her call to the Bar. Michelle practiced with Saskatchewan Justice, Justice Canada, the Saskatchewan Water Security Agency and Brass Law Office. Michelle’s main practice is in the areas of Aboriginal and Water Law. She has taught at the Wiyasiwewin Mikiwahp Native Law Centre Summer Law program. Most recently, Michelle was hired on to complete the Gladue Awareness Project for the Centre. For the Project, Michelle has researched the Gladue case and developed informational materials and held over 16 seminars across Saskatchewan to bring awareness of the Gladue case.

 

C2 | Greg Nelson

Organization: Independent

Topic/Title: When will he ever learn?

                   

         

+ Abstract

Greg depicts his own personal experiences as well as the antics of his famous alter ego, over half a lifetime as a ne'er-do-well as he recalls the slow-motion train wreck that ultimately landed him in jail. He speaks of his experiences as an inmate in the correctional facilities and of how a compassionate approach by a single representative of the justice system changed the trajectory of his life. He relates the fortunate series of events that led him from being a long-term consumer in the formal justice system to be a more productive citizen and provider of restorative and transformative justice services. Greg strives to create an engaging atmosphere through the use of humour and open conversation. He is happy to field questions from the session's participants.

+ Session Objectives

  1. That one never knows how or when their actions or words might alter the course of another person's life.
  2. That even the most dire of circumstances are never hopeless. Restoration is always possible.

+ Speaker Bio

Greg Nelson lives in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. He is a mediator and trainer practicing and training in the fields of family, civil, workplace and organizational mediation as well as restorative justice. He works primarily under contract with The Government of Saskatchewan's Ministry of Justice, Dispute Resolution Office. Greg's interest in Restorative Justice is rooted in his own personal experiences and his career in mediation began first as a volunteer then as an RJ practitioner with his home town's Community Justice Committee in Nipawin, SK.

 

C3 | Christine Peringer

Organization: Independent

Topic/Title: Next Steps on the National Restorative Justice Plan

+ Abstract

At the 2017 NRJS, a Co-Creative Circle workshop developed a plan for a Restorative Canada Network. Plans were developed related to seven themes: Collaboration, Communication, Education, Funding, Inclusion, Practices, System Change.

Working groups have formed since November 2017 for each of these plans. The 2018 Symposium will learn about their progress, reflect on developments and then will confer to identify next steps. This is the place to be if you care about strengthening and growing restorative approaches in Canada.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Facilitate a discussion of progress in each aspect of the 2017 plan
  2. Develop next steps for each area.

+ Speaker Bio

Christine is a facilitator, mediator and communications trainer consulting to non-profit organizations and governments in Canada and internationally. She specializes in leading multi-stakeholder planning and problem-solving processes in justice, health, the environment among other fields. Since graduating from law school, she has held a number of positions as staff or board member of peace and community-building organizations in Ontario and nationally. Christine has been involved as a board member, facilitator and community volunteer with Eastern Ontario’s Lanark County Community Justice since its founding in 2001. At the 2017 NRJS, Christine facilitated the Co-Creative Circle that launched this planning process.

Through his career Norm has worked as a moderator, facilitator, lecturer and teaching assistant; trained in Third Party Neutral practices (Canadian Institute for Conflict Resolution); with experience in government (Department of Justice), a variety of community organizations (the local Egyptian community) and faith groups (the United Church of Canada; the Faith Forum on Property Use), as well as served on a variety of community boards and committees. Norm recently graduated with a Masters in Conflic Studies from St. Paul University (Ottawa).

 

C4 | Bernie Mullins and Ken Quiring

Organization: Brandon Correctional Centre and Grace Mennonite Church

Topic/Title: Working through shame with men in custody.

         

+ Abstract

Many inmates report having strong feelings of shame that adversely impacts their well-being and present a significant challenge to making positive life choices. An important step in the healing process is to overcome experiences of shame and learn to separate these experiences from feelings of guilt. There often are barriers to meaningful discussions of shame such as a lack of understanding of the shame cycle and limited opportunities for inmates to safely and appropriately explore painful life events that contribute to shame. Further complicating this issue is the fact that Inmates’ experiences of shame can be multi-faceted. Shame may originate in the circumstances related to incarceration, early life trauma, relationship breakdown, related criminogenic issues (e.g. addiction, criminal history, education, employment) and experiences borne out of the history of colonialization. ‘Map to the Soul’ is a structured approach that provides inmates incarcerated in a provincial correctional centre with an opportunity to learn important information about the shame dynamic that is based on the ‘Compass of Shame’ model developed by D. Natheson, (1992). The Map to the Soul process uses a restorative approach to healing by encouraging participants to see offending behaviour in terms of its relational and community impact. An important spiritual dimension of the program involves the re-telling of sacred stories (from a Christian perspective) that is inclusive, invitational, and reconciliatory. Participants in this session will hear more about how to safely and appropriately assist inmates in a correctional setting explore and address painful experiences of loss and shame.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Understand the dynamics behind shame.
  2. Introduce a process to address shame while in custody.

+ Speaker Bio

Bernie Mullins has been a prison chaplain, both federally and provincially since 1995. Together with community members he co-founded a restorative justice conference at the Ferndale Institution in Mission, BC. Since 1998 he has been a chaplain at the Brandon Correctional Centre where he has a diverse ministry that brings him into contact with adults, youth, people in crisis and members of the indigenous community. In 2008, he began a concurrent role as the coordinator of chaplains for Manitoba Justice, Community Safety Division. He has an interest in suicide prevention and is an active ASIST facilitator. Bernie originally comes from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and has studied at St. Francis Xavier University and the University of Toronto (Divinity). He is currently a member of Manitoba’s Tri-Diocesan Prison Ministry Committee and the Manitoba Multifaith Council.

Ken is a pastor with Grace Mennonite Church in Brandon, Manitoba, and a master storyteller. He is a certified storyteller with the Network of Biblical Storytellers International and earned a Master of Divinity degree at Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary. Ken volunteers regularly at the hospital and at the provincial correctional centre in Brandon. He is also active in exploring reconciliation between Indigenous and Settler peoples.

 

C5 | Alana Abramson, Jenelle Palfreyman, and Allison Giesbrecht

Organization: Dep. Criminology, Kwantlen Polytech

Topic/Title: Educating for Change: Honouring the Voices of Restorative Justice Participants in BC 

         

+ Abstract

Dr. Alana Abramson from Kwantlen Polytechnic University was a recipient of a 2017/2018 grant from the Ministry of Public Safety & Solicitor General and Office of Crime Reduction and Gang Prevention to research restorative justice in BC. Stories were collected from people who have both facilitated and/or experienced restorative justice related to a variety of situations including serious crime (i.e. involving violence, sexualized violence, etc.), the presence of multiple victims/offenders, power imbalances, mental health and/or substance misuse, or issues that have occurred within families. The themes from the data collected will be presented and with a discussion of the implications of this knowledge for best practices for restorative justice.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Present current data with respect to restorative justice in BC
  2. Provide suggestions for best practice in RJ based on reflections from participants and practitioners.

+ Speaker Bio

Dr. Abramson has been involved in the field of restorative justice (RJ) as an academic, practitioner, and trainer since 1999. She has extensive experience implementing RJ in community, prison, and school contexts. Her research has discussed the role of police and community in RJ. Dr. Abramson’s doctoral work examined the role of post-secondary education in advancing the philosophy and practice of RJ. In 2016, Dr. Abramson was the recipient of the 2017 Restorative Justice Award from the Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General. She also worked to develop the first victim-sensitive principles and standards for restorative justice providers in BC. Dr. Abramson is a full-time Criminology Instructor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Coordinator of the Alternatives to Violence Project, and is trainer/consultant for Achieve/Crisis & Trauma Resource Institute.

Jenelle is a Criminology Honours student at Kwantlen Polytechnic University and has become an advocate of restorative justice through the powerful testimony of her supervisor and mentor Alana Abramson. Although Jenelle’s journey with restorative justice is just beginning, she has been inspired by the possibilities of this philosophy and is passionate about using it to bring healing and restoration. She has recently become an active participant of the Alternatives to Violence Project and as such, has experienced the positive effects of community and truth sharing for herself. She is currently writing her undergraduate thesis on restorative justice in the context of the Canadian criminal justice system. Through consideration of stories and experiences of those who have participated in restorative justice practices, she is confident that this research will assist in the innovation of new approaches to harm where support, community and responsibility are integral to the criminal justice system.

Allison graduated from Kwantlen Polytechnic University in October of 2018 with a Bachelor of Arts major in Criminology. During her degree, she completed a practicum at Kwikwexwhelp Healing Village working as a Student Parole Officer. The experience at Kwikwexwelhp was something she will never forget. Allison felt it was rewarding to get to know the residents and watch the positive changes that they experienced. Her passion for restorative justice developed during her second year of university as she found the powerful healing process that occurs for all parties involved intriguing. Allison is currently a Research Assistant collecting data on restorative justice in BC. She is looking forward to attending her first RJ conference and sharing the findings from the project.

 

C6 | Michelle Funk and Travis Blaine

Organization: John Howard – Brandon

Topic/Title: Post Sentence Victim Offender Mediation: A Voice for Victims and Communities 

+ Abstract

In 2011, an innovative Judge in Manitoba had an idea to include the victims and the community in the justice process, following a serious crime. What followed was the first of many post sentence referrals for Travis Blaine and Michelle Funk of the Westman Mediation Services program of the John Howard Society of Brandon. Due to the success of the first case in the eyes of the victims and the affected community, Judges in the Western area of Manitoba have continued to send victim offender mediation cases, post sentence. The referrals sent are serious in nature including, for example, assault with a weapon, criminal negligence causing death and arson etc. Too often victims and communities are left out of the justice process, often finding no avenue for healing and closure. As well, offenders find they are unable to explain their story and provide context to the offense. The presenters in this session will break down how the post charge referral system works between their program and the justice system, provide examples of cases and how to best engage victims in the process.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Participants will gain an understanding of how the offender, victim and community can play a role in the justice system post-sentence.
  2. Participants will gain an understanding of a community restorative justice programs' path to receiving post charge referrals.

+ Speaker Bios

Travis Blaine has a Degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in Criminal Justice and a certificate in Mediation Skills. He worked 6 years as a Correctional Officer, Parole Officer and Correctional Supervisor at Stony Mountain Institution a Federal Institution. For 10 years, he has been a Victim Offender Mediator at Westman Mediation Services for the John Howard Society of Brandon. Currently the Westman Mediation Services program oversees 10 Justice Committees in the Westman and Parkland areas of Manitoba. Travis is also a Facilitator for Interpersonal Conflict resolution and Mediation Skills.

Michelle Funk is currently a Restorative Justice Facilitator working with the Westman Mediation Services program at the John Howard Society of Brandon. Michelle received a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology from the University of Manitoba and a Master’s Degree in Criminology, with a specific focus on Restorative Justice from Simon Fraser University. In her current position as Restorative Justice Facilitator, Michelle oversees 8 Justice Committees and receives restorative justice referrals from Police, RCMP, Crown, Defense, Judges, Probation and Schools, and provides culturally appropriate restorative justice services, including victim offender mediation, in the Westman Area of Manitoba.

 

C7 | Brenda Morrison, Krystal Glowatski, Muhammad Asadullah, Tania Arvantidis and Tamara Pearl

Organization: Simon Fraser University

Topic/Title: Full Circle Community Praxis: Exploring Emergent Themes from Local, National and International Research and Development

                    ****SOLD OUT****

         

+ Abstract

Students and faculty from Simon Fraser University will lead an experiential workshop rooted in community praxis. The workshop will explore the transformational potential for engagement through two-eyed seeing. Two-eyed seeing reconciles Indigenous and western perspectives to find new ways forward.

Each presenter will tell a narrative of his or her research, incorporating interactive participant engagement. The audience will be invited to map the storytelling, as each presenter builds on the last, creating a visual representation of the research, and how we envision safe, healthy, and inclusive communities. Participants in this workshop will gain a deeper understanding of the complexity of community and how research can serve to expand and refine our collective understandings of community.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Participants will gain an understanding of the importance and issues related to community in restorative justice.
  2. Participants will be able to identify key elements (both theoretically and practically) in building community, such as but not limited to: relationships, active citizenship, and respect.

+ Speaker Bio

Brenda Morrison is the Director of the Centre for Restorative Justice and an Associate Professor in the School of Criminology, Simon Fraser University. She is a social psychologist with field experience in outdoor education, government administration, and justice. She has developed a range of restorative justice courses within the School of Criminology and Faculty of Education. Internationally, she has presented papers at the House of Lords and UNESCO. She serves on the Board of Smart Justice Canada, and on the justice reform initiatives for the he Federal and Provincial Ministry of Justice. In her home community, she is an active board member for the North Shore Restorative Justice Society.

Krystal Glowatski is a fifth year PhD student at Simon Fraser University. She has been personally interested in restorative justice since childhood, and professionally engaged in the study and practice throughout her academic career. Her past research has focused on public and police perceptions of restorative justice. Her PhD research focuses on understanding the lived-experiences of those related to an offender using a relational lens, and how restorative practices can impact those experiences. She also engages in volunteer mediation work, as she has a passion to help others and to see restorative justice in practice.

M. Asadullah is a PhD candidate at Simon Fraser University’s School of Criminology. He has a Masters in Criminology from Simon Fraser University, Canada, and a Masters in Conflict Transformation from Eastern Mennonite University, USA. His research interests include restorative justice, village court, peacemaking criminology, indigenous justice and compassionate communication. As a sessional faculty, Asadullah taught Restorative Justice at Simon Fraser University and Peace & Conflict Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley for a number of semesters. He is the recipient of multiple awards and scholarships including ACJS Doctoral Fellowship Award, C.D. Nelson Memorial Graduate Award, Provost Prize of Distinction, Graduate Fellowship and Law Foundation Scholarship in Restorative Justice. Currently, he is the board member of Vancouver Association for Restorative Justice and Salish Sea Empathy Society. He volunteers in both federal and provincial prisons. Asadullah is an NVC Certification candidate with the Center for Nonviolent Communication, USA. To showcase his work, he has participated in a number of international trainings and conferences in Canada, China, Malaysia, Thailand, Norway, Turkey, UK, and USA.

Tania Arvanitidis is a PhD Candidate within the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University. She obtained her B.A. in Sociology and Social Psychology at the University of Guelph in 2009, and her M.A. in Criminology at Simon Fraser University in 2013. Her M.A. thesis, “From Revenge to Restoration: Evaluating General Deterrence as a Primary Sentencing Purpose for Rioters in Vancouver, British Columbia”, examined the sentencing of adult rioters convicted of participating in the 2011 hockey riot that took place in Vancouver, Canada, on June 15, 2011, and argued for the use of restorative justice for rioters in place of custody sentences. Tania’s PhD research examines the evaluation of restorative justice programming and, specifically, explores the problem of measuring “success”, within the context of restorative justice conferencing, in a “relational” way. Locally, Tania has been a member of the Board of Directors for the Vancouver Association for Restorative Justice.

Tamara Pearl is a Registered Clinical Counsellor and an adjunct faculty member in Adler University’s Masters of Counseling Psychology and Art Therapy program. She is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University. She has volunteered as a restorative justice facilitator and has worked in cross-cultural bridge building with Peace it Together, Reconciliation Canada, and The Daniel Pearl Foundation.

 

C8 | Katelyn Siggelkow

Organization: Servant Partners

Topic/Title: Stronger Together: an empowered journey from isolation into communities of belonging

                    ****SOLD OUT****

         

+ Abstract

Two things are required for social change: to imagine a better world and to understand oppression. In this workshop we will discuss how to shift society from isolation and division into thriving communities of belonging. To get there, we will address the divisive power of privilege and race in order to understand how our systems deny full participation to many. Then we will move through to imagine a society where these voices that are so often silenced, pitied and overlooked are actually listened to. Communities can thrive when each member is empowered to belong, to contribute their gifts and to pursue transformation together. Katelyn will draw on her experience working with marginalized communities to share a simple model of community organizing that serves to unleash the potential of individuals whose voices are often overlooked Participants will be equipped with powerful question-asking and active-listening skills to facilitate inclusive community transformation. While these skills are fundamental in bringing people together across barriers, they are versatile and essentially effective anywhere that relationships exist! Participants can look forward to applying their new skills in the work place, in neighbourhood meetings, with clients, or even in parenting!

+ Session Objectives

  1. Participants will learn leadership empowerment skills, with a focus on elevating the voice of the marginalized to catalyze social change
  2. Participants will be equipped in skills of community organizing to create space of belonging and bring people together around a common goal for transformation

+ Speaker Bio

Katelyn Siggelkow has learned that the best life is one that is shared generously. She has lived and worked in marginalized communities in Downtown Eastside, Vancouver, and most recently in the West Side of Saskatoon. Here she participates in the leadership empowerment of her neighbours to pursue the holistic transformation of their community together. Believing that change starts from within the community, she approaches her work with curiosity and admiration for all the people she meets in her low-income neighbourhood. She finds that community transformation often boils down to the simple act of sharing stories with one another. Since stories have been so powerful in her life, when Katelyn is not with neighbours, you’ll likely find her listening to podcasts, reading a book, or taking in some local theatre or poetry!

 

*Please note, speakers are subject to change.

Workshop

Series D Speakers

Tuesday, November 20 | 2:30p - 4:00p

NRJS_web_imageheader-03.jpg

D1 | Glen Luther and Mansfield Mela

Organization: College of Law, University of Saskatchewan

Topic/Title: Restorative Justice in a Therapeutic Context

+ Abstract

This session will be designed to address the use of Restorative Justice principles in a Therapeutic Court setting. We will contrast the aims and purposes of Therapeutic Jurisprudence with Restorative Justice principles. Throughout the common law world therapeutic courts are being employed to solve problems evidenced by accused peoples’ offending. Drug Courts, Wellness Courts and Mental Health Courts are examples that are now in place in most jurisdictions. While Therapeutic principles are not the same as restorative justice principles it is the presenters’ view that Restorative Justice has a significant role to play in a Therapeutic court. While therapeutic principles suggest courts should try to “help” offenders, restorative justice aims to restore the balance of the community. It will be suggested that these aims are compatible and will often result in similar success in addressing the root causes of offending while helping to solve our over-incarceration problem.

The presenters have extensive experience in setting up, supervising and observing various therapeutic courts in Canada and New Zealand. It is suggested that New Zealand’s Alcohol and other Drugs Treatment Court (AODT Court) and Rangatahi (youth) courts are exceptional models that should be studied and emulated in Canada. In Canada the over-incarceration of indigenous peoples is widely known but, in many places, most notably Saskatchewan, little has been done to address the ever-increasing use of jail as the primary method of addressing offending. In Gladue the Supreme Court stressed the need to redress the trend to over-incarceration of indigenous peoples. In Ipeelee the Court suggested that restorative justice has a large role to play in this need to seek alternatives to prison. It is in the context of therapeutic courts that restorative justice has the largest traction with judges who are willing to listen to those seeking to create innovative alternatives.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Understand the basic principles of therapeutic jurisprudence and to contrast them with those of restorative justice
  2. Understand how a therapeutic court can employ restorative justice principles to reduce the use of incarceration and offending

+ Speaker Bio

Professor Glen Luther LL.B. (Sask.) LL.M. (Queen’s) (https://law.usask.ca/people/faculty/glen-luther.php ) is a criminal lawyer and researcher with a specific emphasis on indigenous peoples, mental illness and sentencing. While having extensive practical experience in criminal practice, Professor Luther now focuses on his teaching and research in an attempt to influence the criminal courts to make them more humane and just. Professor Luther is of indigenous ancestry and is a faculty member at the College of Law and an Associate member of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan where in 2018 he teaches Criminal Law, Sentencing and Indigenous People and the Criminal Justice System. He is a member of the Saskatchewan Review Board. Glen is an advisor to CLASSIC Inc. Saskatoon’s poverty law clinic and a member of the advisory Board of CREATE Justice.

Prof Mansfield Mela is a forensic psychiatrist and Founder of the forensic subspecialty of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. He is an associate faculty member of the College of Law and teaches medical and law undergraduate and post graduate students. He received the 2018 faculty teaching award of the department of Psychiatry. He is a member of the College of Graduate studies and research of the University of Saskatchewan. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in London and of the American Psychiatric Association. As an expert he has been called upon to testify on various aspects of the interface of law and psychiatry. This includes criminal and civil matters. He is a member of the Saskatchewan Review Board and a member of the Saskatchewan Physician Health program. His research focuses on psycho-legal aspects of forensic mental health, with specific interests and expertise in the area of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Under the Canada Research network of Canada (CanFASD), a multidisciplinary group of researchers, policy makers and family of caregivers, he serves as the Research Co-Lead in the diagnostic domain. He also developed the forgiveness program with colleagues studying the effect of religiosity and spirituality on offending behavior. He brings a clinical perspective to his research questions and seeks to generate research and implement knowledge to achieve evidence-based practice amongst forensic mental health and FASD populations. His research laboratory can be accessed: https://research-groups.usask.ca/psycholegal-fasd/index.php

 

D2 | Muhammad Asadullah

Organization: Simon Fraiser University - PHD candidate of Criminology

Topic/Title: Restorative Justice in British Columbia, Nova Scotia and Bangladesh: Comparative Community

+ Abstract

Using qualitative methods, this doctoral research explores the growth and impact of Restorative Justice across three research sites: British Columbia (BC), Nova Scotia (NS) and Bangladesh (BD). The main objective of this paper is to map the development of RJ practices across BC, NS and BD. With that aim, survey and twenty-four in-depth qualitative interviews— ten in BC, eight in NS and six in BD—have been conducted where visionaries and community practitioners from diverse background participated. Both snowball and purposive sampling techniques were used to recruit participants. This study finds contrasting examples of the role of government agencies, civil society organizations, community volunteers and funding mechanisms at different research sites. Whilst grassroots community played a pioneering role in BC, government agencies were key movers of RJ practices in NS. In Bangladesh, centuries-long Salish practices, case backlogs and funding from the international community played a catalytic role to the growth of RJ and community-based justice practices. Issues that contributed to the growth of RJ in these three sites were categorized into macro, meso and micro factors. The findings of this research will not only contribute to the extant literature and practice of restorative justice, they will also play an important role within the research sites, which will set the stage for further research. The paper ends with a discussion of the challenges and areas for the future research.

+ Session Objectives

  1. To explain the history and growth of Restorative Justice in BC, Nova Scotia and Bangladesh
  2. To share similarities and differences in RJ practices across these 3 research sites.

+ Speaker Bio

M. Asadullah is a PhD candidate at Simon Fraser University’s School of Criminology. He has a Masters in Criminology from Simon Fraser University, Canada, and a Masters in Conflict Transformation from Eastern Mennonite University, USA. His research interests include restorative justice, village court, peacemaking criminology, indigenous justice and compassionate communication. As a sessional faculty, Asadullah taught Restorative Justice at Simon Fraser University and Peace & Conflict Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley for a number of semesters. He is the recipient of multiple awards and scholarships including ACJS Doctoral Fellowship Award, C.D. Nelson Memorial Graduate Award, Provost Prize of Distinction, Graduate Fellowship and Law Foundation Scholarship in Restorative Justice. Currently, he is the board member of Vancouver Association for Restorative Justice and Salish Sea Empathy Society. He volunteers in both federal and provincial prisons. Asadullah is an NVC Certification candidate with the Center for Nonviolent Communication, USA. To showcase his work, he has participated in a number of international trainings and conferences in Canada, China, Malaysia, Thailand, Norway, Turkey, UK, and USA.

 

D3 | Donna Lerat

Organization: Prince Albert Indian & Metis Friendship Center

Topic/Title: ‘Ho’ with Moccasins

                   

+ Abstract

Donna would like to bring to the forefront one area that is still inadequate in Saskatchewan, this is the discrimination, stigma and continued lack of support services for women in the sex trade. Donna ran the STEPPN UP project when possible for support for sex trade workers; I also encourage cultural ceremony’s and I continue to seek methods to support Aboriginal women in the sex trade and the health and social determinants. She would like to introduce you to five women from Saskatchewan.

  • Video ‘Hookers A Documentary’
  • Medicine Wheel
  • Ceremony & Change

+ Session Objectives

  1. Learn about Prostitution & Justice
  2. Healing & Recovery through Culture & Traditions

+ Speaker Bio

“A fiercely determined Cree woman who left behind a bleak existence on the streets, Donna was raised in foster homes, became addicted to drugs and got caught up in prostitution by the age of 15; she has re-emerged as a powerful voice sharing with laughter her struggles and her accomplishments.” Donna Lerat has been sharing her life experiences since 1993; to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities. She’s been in TV programs, radio and films. Topics include prostitution, drugs/alcohol, family violence, health & sexual health, parenting, education and much more. Currently, Donna is employed as a Court worker at the Prince Albert Indian Metis Friendship Center and as a casual Elder at Willow Cree Healing Lodge, and taking Justice Studies; Donna is a writer and is working on a book for recovering addicts. Donna continues to motivate, support and advocate for women, and children in turtle island, she can make you laugh and cry at the same time without missing a beat.

 

D4 | Lorna Lemay and Daniel Markus

Organization: ForGiving, ForRestoring Canada

Topic/Title: Forgiveness, a concept or a commitment?

                   

         

+ Abstract

Our Schools of Forgiveness and Reconciliation, named “Espere”, (acronym for the Spanish “EScuelas de PErdón y REconciliación”) are an experiential workshop designed by Fundación para la Reconciliación Colombia for people who decide to live a personal journey of liberation from the impact of violence in their lives. Our 60-hour and 12-module program guides participants about what forgiveness and reconciliation are and what they are not, and how to set on that journey. The methodology relies on small peer-support groups where participants can safely tell their story and make catharsis. It helps them to cleanse their pain and heal the wounds of violence, and empowers them to regain control of their emotions and lives in order to move forward. The last modules explore principles of dignity, truth, justice and dialogue to open an optional path to reconciliation, it it is viable and desirable for the victim and the community. Since 2002, this revolutionary pedagogical model has spread to 21 countries and more than 2 million people have learned the practice of forgiveness through it. It has also been widely researched, and recognized by the UNESCO Education for Peace Prize (Paris, 2006) for its significant contribution to peacebuilding in Latin America.

+ Session Objectives

  1. to introduce participants to forgiveness as a process that requires commitment and effort
  2. to introduce participants to reconciliation as a potential option for moving forward

+ Speaker Bio

Lorna has been a leader in the not-for-profit world in the fields of mediation, conflict resolution, training, and group dialogues, for many years. She has a lifelong passion for learning in her efforts to contribute to peace-building at the individual, family, community, and broader levels.

Daniel shares his presence & experience as an Espere facilitator and a peace practitioner to the process.

 

D5 | Annelies Bertsch and Marielle Comeau

Organization: Prem Rawat Foundation

Topic/Title: Peace Education Program

                    ****SOLD OUT****

         

+ Abstract

The highly successful Peace Education Program (PEP) was developed and is offered by The Prem Rawat Foundation (TPRF). This international non-profit public foundation was established in 2001 and has hundreds of international supporters and volunteers worldwide. PEP was developed in 2012 and is now offered in 81 countries with 885 courses in correctional facilities http://www.tprf.org/programs/peace-education-program/

The non-denominational Peace Education Program is an application of restorative justice as the individual learns ways to go forward by making peace with themselves, which leads to forgiving or making peace with others. In Canada, PEP is offered at the Vanier Center for Women, a provincial jail in Milton, Ontario, and the William Head Institution, a federal prison in Victoria.

The Peace Education Program has been endorsed by the CEA (Correctional Education Association) and NACRJ (National Association for Community and Restorative Justice). PEP has been approved for distribution throughout the prison systems of South Africa, Spain, Portugal, Brazil and Queensland, Australia. Overview: We will introduce the Peace Education Program (PEP) in multimedia-based session. We will demonstrate how this innovative program brings a more humane approach to correctional facilities, improving the quality of life of inmates on the inside, as well as the success of those returning to the outside. We will show a short clip of the award-winning documentary “Inside Peace” (insidepeacemovie.com) which follows four men incarcerated at the Dominguez State Jail in San Antonio, Texas who embark on a journey of self-discovery as they attend the PEP peace class.

Thank you for considering our presentation of the original and ground-breaking Peace Education Program, as a truly innovative way to move inmates beyond a correctional experience into an experience of personal peace.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Participants will become familiar with TPRF's Peace Education Program.
  2. Participants will experience a sample PEP workshop.

+ Speaker Bio

Annelies is a retired elementary school teacher from Saskatchewan who after retirement moved to Victoria, BC. Eager to find some meaningful volunteer work she happily learned of the Peace Education Program through a video showing the positive effects of this program on inmates in a Texas prison. She has been a volunteer with the PEP since 2012 helping out in her local and regional communities and also with the global support team for the PEP. She continues to have enthusiasm for introducing this program wherever possible and would be delighted to be a presenter back in her home province at the RJ Symposium.

Since she retired as a Registered Nurse, Marielle Comeau’s life has been focused on human needs: She is involved as a volunteer with The Prem Rawat Foundation (tprf.org) since 2001, embracing its mission of addressing the fundamental human needs of food, water and peace so that people can live their lives with “Dignity, Peace and Prosperity.”

 

D6 | Lori St.Onge & Pamela Large-Moran

Organization: Mi'kmaq Confederacy of PEI

Topic/Title: Bringing Balance to the Scales of Justice for Indigenous people

                    ****SOLD OUT****

                   

+ Abstract

Indigenous people are over-represented in the Canadian justice system as both offenders and victims of crime. It is our hope that this workshop will shed light on both the historical circumstances that have led to this situation and the innovative efforts being made to incorporate an Indigenous world view into our justice system. By implementing restorative justice models, providing offenders with access to traditional cultural practices and ceremonies, and focusing an individual and community healing, there is new hope that we can bring balance to the scales of justice.

+ Session Objectives

  1. Increase knowledge of Indigenous history and culture.
  2. Increase knowledge of reconciliation and healing for Indigenous People.

+ Speaker Bios

Lori St. Onge has been the Director of Indigenous Justice for the Mi’kmaq Confederacy of PEI since 2007. She graduated from the University of PEI with a Master’s in Business Administration, Bachelor of Arts and a Diploma in Public Administration. She also holds a certificate in Human Resource Management, Conflict Resolution and Circle Keeping. Lori is also a trained Gladue writer.

Lori is an advocate for restorative justice. A process which focuses on the rehabilitation of offenders through reconciliation with victims and the community. She is a proud Mi’kmaq woman and a member of the Lennox Island First Nation.

Lori sits on numerous committees and boards including the RCMP Commissioner National Aboriginal Advisory Committee. She has been a mentor for the In Business Program, a mentorship program for Indigenous youth, since 2015. She was appointed to the PEI Human Rights Commission in 2017.

Pamela Large Moran B.A., L.L.B., L.L.M. (ADR), C.Med., C.Arb. is a lawyer, Mediator and Arbitrator who, for the past twenty years, has been a leader in the areas of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and Conflict Management. She is a passionate advocate for the healing and transformative opportunities in restorative processes. Some of her past experience has been in Indigenous communities leading restorative circles, including conflict resolution, healing, and sentencing circles. She has further conducted work across the country as an Adjudicator in the Indian Residential Schools Independent Assessment Process (IAP), and as an Appeals Officer in the Newfoundland Residential School Settlement Process. Additionally, she has conducted work as an Evaluator in the Nova Scotia Home For Colored Children Settlement Restorative Process, assessing claims of historical abuse and systemic discrimination with a trauma-informed lens. She is a past Director and Vice-President of the ADR Institute of Canada (ADRIC), is presently a Section Chair of the Canadian Bar Association (CBA) National Aboriginal Law Section, and Co-Chair of the PEI Restorative Justice Committee.

 

D7 | Christine Goodwin

Organization: Seventh Generation consulting group

Topic/Title: FASD as a Gladue Factor: Amendments to the Criminal Code

+ Abstract

Gladue is a resource that is used to get information about an Aboriginal offender before the court. FASD is prevalent in First Nation societies. Gladue came about in reaction to an over representation of Aboriginal people in jail. The over representation is connected to colonialism. FASD in Aboriginal communities is a result of colonization and therefore should be regarded as a Gladue factor. Gladue submissions serve two distinct purposes. The first is to determine the moral blameworthiness of an offender and the second is to set out alternatives to incarceration that include community resources, support and cultural teachings. An example of how the restorative justice options set out in a Gladue report were/are successful for one individual is evident in the Drysdale case. This was a situation where the individual had been diagnosed with FASD but had slipped through the cracks his entire life until he got sentenced according to the restorative justice options that were set out in the Gladue report. Alternatives included cultural teachings and support, FASD network, Ehrlo counselling, SAID, Aboriginal family services and other agencies. He qualified for this high degree of restorative justice support because FASD was brought to light in the Gladue report. He is a success today and has spent the most time out of jail incident free than he has since he was 11 years old. The connection between Gladue and FASD are central to restorative justice measures in an estimated 23% of Aboriginal people sentenced in Canada. Without a Gladue report investigation many of the FASD cases would not even come to light.

+ Session Objectives

  1. To inform and critique the current systems available for FASD offenders
  2. Discuss the alternatives to incarceration and the link between FASD and Gladue offenders

+ Speaker Bio

Christine is an Ojibwe woman from Curve Lake First Nation, Ontario. Graduated from the University of Calgary with an honours degree in History and a Law degree. She worked as a lawyer in Calgary area and operated her own law firm for eight years until moving to Saskatoon to work on a Masters of Law degree. Christine has been speaking in meetings, AGM's and university events for several years.

 

D8 | Peter Worsley and David Feick

Organization: MCC and Micah Mission

Topic/Title: Faith Community Reintegration Projects

                    ****SOLD OUT****

           

+ Abstract

A discussion about faith or forms of spirituality to look at what, within these areas, helps offenders transform their lives and reintegrate. What is the role of the faith community in reintegration? What is the role of the offender? What helps and what hinders?

+ Session Objectives

  1. Faith and hope combined with loving action are needed for successful re-entry
  2. Self-forgiveness and community forgiveness/acceptance are needed for successful re-entry

+ Speaker Bio

Peter Worsley (BA focusing on Leadership and Ministry, Social Work Diploma) is in his fifteenth year working as a Reintegration Chaplain with Mennonite Central Committee Alberta. He provides spiritual, emotional, social and practical support to released offenders. He works in conjunction with the faith community, volunteers and other agencies. Peter has a background in community development, volunteer management and in working across cultures.

Dave Feick (BTh, MTS, Certified Spiritual Care Practitioner) has been working for The Micah Mission (Micah) in Saskatoon for 6 years, first as Coordinator now as Executive Director. He has 20 years experience as a pastor and now oversees Micah's programs: Person to Person - a visitation program at the Regional Psychiatric Center; CoSA (Circles of Support and Accountability) program. He also is the Community Chaplain for the Faith Community Reintegration Project for Micah.

 

*Please note, speakers are subject to change.